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The Tory’s Guide to Spring Courses

Last semester we offered you, dear reader, a shortlist of ten recommended courses that we hoped might help you cobble together an enriching class schedule for the pursuit of the liberal arts (properly understood). We now present our recommendations for this spring: PHI301: Aristotle and His Successors– Every student of the liberal arts should study…

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Publisher’s Letter: On Moderation

Nobody likes an extremist. Fanatic, radical, firebrand, extremist. We have an arsenal of pejoratives for the politician too far on this or that side of the aisle. Yet for all the societal antipathy towards zealous demagogues, nobody seems to like so-called “moderates” either. The latter are often called wishy-washy, flip-flopping, or unprincipled. It seems a…

Letter to the Editor

Dear Sir, I must respectfully disagree with the premise of the “Rape Culture” article, namely that “if sex is meaningless, than rape is only as bad as a wet willy…”. In response, I’d like to use an example from Mean Girls, a 2004 film starring Lindsay Lohan. In the movie, Lindsay Lohan, playing a socially…

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Professor Profile: Melissa Lane

Melissa Lane is the Class of 1943 Professor of Politics at Princeton, and is currently serving a two-year term as the Associate Chair of the Department of Politics. She is also an associated faculty member in the Classics and Philosophy Departments. Professor Lane’s past writings have focused on the links between Greek political theory and…

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The Case for Positive Rights

According to libertarians, the only rights that should be legally recognized are what are often called negative rights, or rights of non-interference (like the rights not to be unjustly or non-consensually killed, enslaved, and bodily violated).[1] Under this conception of rights—call it the libertarian conception—positive rights or rights to goods or services (such as the…

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In Defense of the President’s War Powers

Since the founding of the Republic, the President and Congress have battled over how the power to initiate armed conflict on behalf of the United States of America ought to be balanced. Today, these conflicts manifest themselves primarily in political battles over the limitations on executive war powers, such as whether President Obama needs congressional…

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Alcohol Policy and the Need for Federalism

Ever since the United States gained its independence, a fierce debate has raged over just how much power the federal government ought to have compared to the states. Some argue that the federal government should have more power in order to make the country’s laws universal, claiming that it is not a good idea for…

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Totalitarianism and Dystopian Literature: A Review

The struggle against a totalitarian government is unsurprisingly a frequent theme in dystopian literature. Almost by definition the genre is set in a futuristic society characterized by extreme oppression and despondence. Malevolent autocrats at the helms of totalitarian governments have, throughout our history, been responsible for innumerable travesties. This young century alone has witnessed the…

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The Republican Party’s Path to Victory

Editor’s note–we are publishing this piece before we deliver hard copies of the magazine in order to ensure it can be viewed well in advance of the election. Other articles from our October issue will be released online after the magazines are distributed following Fall Break. The morning of November 7, 2012, Republicans across the…